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Waiting
by Thomas Fullmer

I wait for the bus
painfully, because my knees are killing me
I wonder if I could die waiting
or turn into an old oak tree

I wait for a traffic light
when it turns green
I wait for the queue of cars to move
green arrows are the worst
it’s like no one really knows
what green arrows mean

I am still waiting.

PAINTING: The Traveller by Jeffrey Smart (1973).

NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR: Of late I have taken to writing shorter poems, micro poems and Haiku. I wrote several poems based on the prompt. I often read something interesting, and write a poem based on it. Such as passages of scriptures, or famous quotes that motivate me creatively. I also get motivated by memories, memories of my youth, and memories of my time as an archaeology student in Petra the Summer of 1985. I compare my life to that of a desert. Rain doesn’t fall often in the desert to turn desert flowers vibrant. Love doesn’t fall in the desert of my soul, now that my wife has passed away a year-and-a-half ago. Many of my poems are about her, and how I have mourned my loss now she is gone. My second book is dedicated to her. My deepest poems involve my suffering over this loss, and so are therapeutic. They are about trial and tribulations, and how we can deal with the vicissitudes of life. They have helped those who loved my wife and whom she loved, including my children and grandchildren. That is a very long list.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Thomas Fullmer is a self-published poet and author of children’s books who grew up in a small town in central Utah. He is a retired postal worker who writes. His poetry collections include From the Fabric of My Mind, In the Crucible of My Catharsis, and From the Fabric of My Soul. He has also published in the FM quarterly magazine through Rose Books. He has been writing poetry for over 25 years, and is also the author of the children’s books Roslyn, the Reluctant Rattlesnake, and the soon-to-be-published, El, the Elusive Electron. More can be learned about Fullmer’s books at his website. Visit him on Facebook and Twitter.