Archives for category: Songs

On May 24, 2003, Paul McCartney makes his first visit to the Soviet Union, and performs his greatest hits, including “Maybe I’m Amazed,” for over 100,000 people at Red Square in Moscow — moving even grown men to tears. This clip is from McCartney Live in Red Square (2003), available at Amazon.com.

ABOUT THE CONCERT: For the Russian audience, McCartney’s appearance in Moscow is little short of a miracle. The Beatles were banned for decades by the Soviet government, which regarded their music as the epitome of Western decadence and propaganda, and the fans’ only access to the group was through the occasional black market album. Their reaction to his 2003 visit is a mixture of frenzy and rapture. In interview after interview, what one fan calls the Beatles’ “gentle intervention” is credited with helping to bring down the whole Soviet system, simply because they represented a creativity and freedom that had been almost totally silenced.

Julie Andrews, as Queen Guenevere, sings “The Lusty Month of May” from Camelot, the 1960 musical by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe based on the King Arthur legend as adapted from the T. H. White novel The Once and Future King. Read the lyrics at stlyrics.com.

Dean Martin sings “Nevertheless” in a clip from 1955.

NEVERTHELESS
by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar (1931)

Maybe I’m right, maybe I’m wrong
Maybe I’m weak, maybe I’m strong
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.
Maybe I’ll win, maybe I’ll lose
Maybe I’m in for cryin’ the blues
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.
Somehow I know at a glance the terrible chances that I’m takin’.
Fine at the start then left with a heart that is breakin’.
Maybe I’ll live a life of regret
Maybe I’ll give much more than I get
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.
Somehow I know at a glance the terrible terrible chances that I’m takin’.
Fine at the start then left with a heart that was breaking.
Maybe I’ll live a life of regret
And maybe I’ll give so much more than I get
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.

If you don’t know why people celebrate Cinco de Mayo, here’s a fun, fast way to get a history lesson from a song written and performed by Jonathan Mann. Happy Cinco de Mayo!

Talking Heads perform “Once in a Lifetime” (You May Ask Yourself) in the film Stop Making Sense (1984) directed by Jonathan Demme.

ONCE IN A LIFETIME
Words and Music by David Byrne, Brian Eno, Chris Frantz, Jerry Harrison, and Tina Weymouth

And you may find yourself living in a shotgun shack
And you may find yourself in another part of the world
And you may find yourself behind the wheel of a large automobile
And you may find yourself in a beautiful house, with a beautiful
wife
And you may ask yourself — Well…How did I get here?

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

And you may ask yourself
How do I work this?
And you may ask yourself
Where is that large automobile?
And you may tell yourself
This is not my beautiful house!
And you may tell yourself
This is not my beautiful wife!
Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…

Water dissolving…and water removing
There is water at the bottom of the ocean
Carry the water at the bottom of the ocean
Remove the water at the bottom of the ocean!

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/in the silent water
Under the rocks and stones/there is water underground.

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

And you may ask yourself
What is that beautiful house?
And you may ask yourself
Where does that highway go?
And you may ask yourself
Am I right?…Am I wrong?
And you may tell yourself
MY GOD!…WHAT HAVE I DONE?

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/in the silent water
Under the rocks and stones/there is water underground.

Letting the days go by/let the water hold me down
Letting the days go by/water flowing underground
Into the blue again/after the money’s gone
Once in a lifetime/water flowing underground.

Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…
Same as it ever was…Same as it ever was…

“Morning Has Broken” is a hymn first published in 1931 with lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon and set to a traditional Scottish Gaelic tune known as “Bunessan.” Cat Stevens included a version on his 1971 album Teaser and the Firecat. This performance is by the Old Royal Naval College Chapel Choir.

MORNING HAS BROKEN
lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon

Morning has broken, like the first morning.
Blackbird has spoken, like the first bird.
Praise for the singing, praise for the morning,
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word.

Sweet the rain’s new fall, sunlight from heaven.
Like the first dewfall, on the first grass.
Praise for the sweetnes of the wet garden,
Sprung in completeness where His feet pass.

Mine is the sunlight, mine is the morning.
Born of the one light Eden saw play.
Praise with elation, praise every morning;
God’s recreation of the new day.

Morning has broken, like the first morning.
Blackbird has spoken, like the first bird.
Praise for the singing, praise for the morning,
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word.

“When you’re lost in the rain in Juarez and it’s Eastertime, too…”

Recorded August 16, 1956. Ella sings and Satchmo sings and plays.

Lady Day sings the classic “April in Paris,” composed in 1932 by Vernon Duke with lyrics by E. Y. Harburg for the Broadway musical Walk A Little Faster. The recording appears on Billie Holiday‘s album All or Nothing at All, recorded in 1956 and 1957 and released by Verve Records in 1958.

Some of the all-time most original lyrics! Read them here.