Archives for category: Videos

Dean Martin sings “Nevertheless” in a clip from 1955.

NEVERTHELESS
by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar (1931)

Maybe I’m right, maybe I’m wrong
Maybe I’m weak, maybe I’m strong
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.
Maybe I’ll win, maybe I’ll lose
Maybe I’m in for cryin’ the blues
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.
Somehow I know at a glance the terrible chances that I’m takin’.
Fine at the start then left with a heart that is breakin’.
Maybe I’ll live a life of regret
Maybe I’ll give much more than I get
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.
Somehow I know at a glance the terrible terrible chances that I’m takin’.
Fine at the start then left with a heart that was breaking.
Maybe I’ll live a life of regret
And maybe I’ll give so much more than I get
But nevertheless I’m in love with you.

If you don’t know why people celebrate Cinco de Mayo, here’s a fun, fast way to get a history lesson from a song written and performed by Jonathan Mann. Happy Cinco de Mayo!

You say tomato, I say tomato…Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers sing “Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off” (music  by George Gershwin and lyrics by Ira Gershwin) in the 1937 movie Shall We Dance. In this clip, Fred and Ginger not only sing, but also dance on roller skates. A classic!

Poet Robert Penn Warren reads “Love Recognized.”

LOVE RECOGNIZED
by Robert Penn Warren

There are many things in the world and you
Are one of them. Many things keep happening and
You are one of them, and the happening that
Is you keeps falling like snow
On the landscape of not-you, hiding hideousness, until
The streets and the world of wrath are choked with snow.

How many things have become silent? Traffic
Is throttled. The mayor
Has been, clearly, remiss and the city
Was totally unprepared for such a crisis. Nor
Was I yes, why should this happen to me?
I have always been a law abiding citizen.

But you, like snow, like love, keep falling,
And it is not certain that the world will not be
Covered in a glitter of crystalline whiteness.

Silence.

Laurence Olivier (1907-1989) performs Hamlet’s soliloquy from Act III, Scene 1:

To be, or not to be, that is the question—
Whether ’tis Nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them? To die, to sleep—
No more; and by a sleep, to say we end
The Heart-ache, and the thousand Natural shocks
That Flesh is heir to? ‘Tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep,
To sleep, perchance to Dream; Aye, there’s the rub,
For in that sleep of death, what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause. There’s the respect
That makes Calamity of so long life:
For who would bear the Whips and Scorns of time,
Th’ Oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s Contumely,
The pangs of despised Love, the Law’s delay,
The insolence of Office, and the Spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy takes,
When he himself might his Quietus make
With a bare Bodkin? Who would these Fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovered Country, from whose bourn
No Traveler returns, Puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have,
Than fly to others that we know not of.
Thus Conscience does make Cowards of us all,
And thus the Native hue of Resolution
Is sicklied o’er, with the pale cast of Thought,
And enterprises of great pitch and moment,
With this regard their Currents turn awry,
And lose the name of Action…

“Morning Has Broken” is a hymn first published in 1931 with lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon and set to a traditional Scottish Gaelic tune known as “Bunessan.” Cat Stevens included a version on his 1971 album Teaser and the Firecat. This performance is by the Old Royal Naval College Chapel Choir.

MORNING HAS BROKEN
lyrics by Eleanor Farjeon

Morning has broken, like the first morning.
Blackbird has spoken, like the first bird.
Praise for the singing, praise for the morning,
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word.

Sweet the rain’s new fall, sunlight from heaven.
Like the first dewfall, on the first grass.
Praise for the sweetnes of the wet garden,
Sprung in completeness where His feet pass.

Mine is the sunlight, mine is the morning.
Born of the one light Eden saw play.
Praise with elation, praise every morning;
God’s recreation of the new day.

Morning has broken, like the first morning.
Blackbird has spoken, like the first bird.
Praise for the singing, praise for the morning,
Praise for them springing fresh from the Word.

Modern Masters episode about Henri Matisse hosted by Alastair Sooke.

Happy birthday to Stuart Dybek — novelist, poet, short story writer extraordinaire….

Recorded August 16, 1956. Ella sings and Satchmo sings and plays.

Lady Day sings the classic “April in Paris,” composed in 1932 by Vernon Duke with lyrics by E. Y. Harburg for the Broadway musical Walk A Little Faster. The recording appears on Billie Holiday‘s album All or Nothing at All, recorded in 1956 and 1957 and released by Verve Records in 1958.