Archives for posts with tag: 1969

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In 1969, photographer Henry Diltz and The Doors showed up at The Morrison Hotel – 1246 S. Hope Street in L.A.’s skid row — figuring the proprietor would be more than happy to let them shoot some photos. When the hotel manager told them to hit the road, the group stood on the sidewalk trying to figure out a Plan B. Opportunity knocked when Diltz looked through the hotel’s front window and saw the desk clerk leave his post. He told the bandmates to run inside and assume various positions at the window.

Diltz was able to fire off just one roll of film during the session — but just about every shot turned out a classic. The crown jewel was, of course, the above photo that graced the cover of the 1970 album of the same name.

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I’m a huge fan of street photographer Garry Winogrand (1928-1984) and the above shot of Hollywood and Vine from  1969 is one of my favorites. John Szarkowski, Director of Photography at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, called Winogrand “the central photographer of his generation.” “Hollywood and Vine” is part of the permanent collection at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles. Find a larger version of the photograph here.

Why do I love this photo? For one thing, it’s packed with information — every inch seems to contain secrets waiting to be unlocked. The three women surrounded by beams of light seem mythological — the three graces strolling Hollywood Boulevard. The man in the wheel chair appears to wait for something — a cure, a friend, a few bucks, a blessing from the three graces? The woman in the hat waiting for the bus seems to have stood there since the beginning of time — the eternal waiter. The little boy on the bench stares through his round glasses at the man in the wheel chair, and the two of them become like ends of a scale, a balancing act — the boy looking to the future, while the man looks to the past. There is this and so much more — and it’s all reflected in the store windows.

You can borrow copies of Garry Winogrand’s books, including The Man in the Crowd, from libraries in most major cities. Do yourself a favor, check one out! I’d recommend Amazon, but most of Winogrand’s books are out of print and are selling for astronomical prices ($439.99!) — as noted here. One of the Amazon reviewers remarked: “It takes you forever to get through this book as you sit and look at each picture for a long, long time.” High praise indeed!

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In 1969, photographer Henry Diltz and The Doors showed up at The Morrison Hotel — 1246 S. Hope Street in L.A.’s skid row — figuring the proprietor would be more than happy to let them shoot some photos. When the hotel manager told them to hit the road, the group stood on the sidewalk trying to figure out a Plan B. Opportunity knocked when Diltz looked through the hotel’s front window and saw the desk clerk leave his post. He told the bandmates to run inside and assume various positions at the window.

Diltz was able to fire off just one roll of film during the session — but just about every shot turned out a classic. The crown jewel was, of course, the above photo that graced the cover of the 1970 album of the same name. Dlitz’s photos are currently on display at the Standard Hotel in Hollywood as part of the Sunset Strip Music Festival taking place through August 18th.

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In the above 1975 photo by Ken Regan, Bob Dylan (left) and Allen Ginsberg pay their respects at Jack Kerouac‘s grave in Lowell, Massachusetts. Kerouac died in October 1969 at age 47. Since Kerouac hit that final road, his literary reputation has continued to grow — and people around the world revere his work and consider him a modern master.

The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow Roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars, and in the middle, you see the blue center-light pop, and everybody goes ahh…”

From On The Road by Jack Kerouac