Archives for posts with tag: Bees

MorningGloriesBees
BEES AND MORNING GLORIES
by John Ciardi

Morning glories, pale as a mist drying,
fade from the heat of the day, but already
hunchback bees in pirate pants and with peg-leg
hooks have found and are boarding them.

This could do for the sack of the imaginary
fleet. The raiders loot the galleons even as they
one by one vanish and leave still real
only what has been snatched out of the spell.

I’ve never seen bees more purposeful except
when the hive is threatened. They know
the good of it must be grabbed and hauled
before the whole feast wisps off.

They swarm in light and, fast, dive in,
then drone out, slow, their pantaloons heavy
with gold and sunlight. The line of them,
like thin smoke, wafts over the hedge.

And back again to find the fleet gone.
Well, they got this day’s good of it. Off
they cruise to what stays open longer.
Nothing green gives honey. And by now

you’d have to look twice to see more than green
where all those white sails trembled
when the world was misty and open
and the prize was there to be taken.

SOURCE: “Bees and Morning Glories” appears in John Ciardi‘s collection Person to Person (Rutgers University Press, 1964), available at Amazon.com.

IMAGE: “Morning Glories and Bees” by Virginia. Visit the artist at joyfulbrush.com.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: John Ciardi (1916-1986), while primarily known as a poet, translated Dante‘s Divine Comedy, wrote several volumes of children’s poetry, pursued etymology, contributed to the Saturday Review as a columnist and long-time poetry editor, and directed the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in Vermont. In 1959, Ciardi published a book on how to read, write, and teach poetry, How Does a Poem Mean?, which has proven to be among the most-used books of its kind. At the peak of his popularity in the early 1960s, Ciardi also had a network television program on CBS, Accent.

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THREE STINGS
by Shel Silverstein

George got stung by a bee and said,
“I wouldn’t have got stung if I’d stayed in bed.”
Fred got stung and we heard him roar,
“What am I being punished for?”
Lew got stung and we heard him say,
“I learned somethin’ about bees today.”

Photo: John Covey, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Find “Three Stings” in Falling Up, a 176-page collection of poetry and illustrations by Shel Silverstein, available at Amazon.com.

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THREE STINGS

by Shel Silverstein

George got stung by a bee and said,

“I wouldn’t have got stung if I’d stayed in bed.”

Fred got stung and we heard him roar,

“What am I being punished for?”

Lew got stung and we heard him say,

“I learned somethin’ about bees today.”

***

This little Shel Silverstein rhyme speaks volumes about human nature —  how different people can interpret the same experience in different ways, and how we can choose which “answer” to believe. I like to think of Lew as the quintessential writer — always learning, no latter what happens, and expressing himself in stories, song, and poetry.

Photo: John Covey, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Find “Three Stings” in Falling Up, a 176-page collection of poetry and illustrations by Shel Silverstein, available at Amazon.com, where the book has garnered 100 five-star reviews.

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THE BEE EMERGING

by Matsuo Basho

The bee emerging 

from deep within the peony

departs reluctantly. 

Photo: Cap001Dan, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED