Archives for posts with tag: cheese

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CHEESE POEM: THE MOON
By Oliver Herford

The Moon is like a big round cheese
That shines above the garden trees,

And like a cheese grows less each night,
     
As though some one had had a bite.
 

 
The Mouse delights to nibble cheese,
     
The Dog bites anything he sees —

But how could they bite off the Moon
     
Unless they went in a balloon?
 

 
And Human People, when they eat
     
They think it rude to bite their meat,

They use a Knife or Fork or Spoon;
     
Who is it then that bites the moon?

Photo: “Yellow Full Moon” by Faiza, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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CHEESE HAIKI
by Deb Install 

Please give me some cheese
Hard, soft, strong, weak — all are fine
Don’t forget the wine.

Visit the poet’s Twitter page here.

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O CHEESE
By Donald Hall

In the pantry the dear dense cheeses, Cheddars and harsh
Lancashires; Gorgonzola with its magnanimous manner;
the clipped speech of Roquefort; and a head of Stilton
that speaks in a sensuous riddling tongue like Druids.
O cheeses of gravity, cheeses of wistfulness, cheeses
that weep continually because they know they will die.
O cheeses of victory, cheeses wise in defeat, cheeses
fat as a cushion, lolling in bed until noon.
Liederkranz ebullient, jumping like a small dog, noisy;
Pont l’Evêque intellectual, and quite well informed; Emmentaler
decent and loyal, a little deaf in the right ear;
and Brie the revealing experience, instantaneous and profound.
O cheeses that dance in the moonlight, cheeses
that mingle with sausages, cheeses of Stonehenge.
O cheeses that are shy, that linger in the doorway,
eyes looking down, cheeses spectacular as fireworks.
Reblochon openly sexual; Caerphilly like pine trees, small
at the timberline; Port du Salut in love; Caprice des Dieux
eloquent, tactful, like a thousand-year-old hostess;
and Dolcelatte, always generous to a fault.
O village of cheeses, I make you this poem of cheeses,
O family of cheeses, living together in pantries,
O cheeses that keep to your own nature, like a lucky couple,
this solitude, this energy, these bodies slowly dying.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Donald Hall (born 1928) was the first poetry editor of The Paris Review. He served as United States Poet Laureate (2006-2007) and has been the recipient of many award and honors, including Guggenheim Fellowships, designation as Poet Laureate of New Hampshire (198401989), National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, Los Angeles Times Book Prize in poetry, and the National Medal of Arts (2010).

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O CHEESE
By Donald Hall

In the pantry the dear dense cheeses, Cheddars and harsh
Lancashires; Gorgonzola with its magnanimous manner;
the clipped speech of Roquefort; and a head of Stilton
that speaks in a sensuous riddling tongue like Druids.
O cheeses of gravity, cheeses of wistfulness, cheeses
that weep continually because they know they will die.
O cheeses of victory, cheeses wise in defeat, cheeses
fat as a cushion, lolling in bed until noon.
Liederkranz ebullient, jumping like a small dog, noisy;
Pont l’Evêque intellectual, and quite well informed; Emmentaler
decent and loyal, a little deaf in the right ear;
and Brie the revealing experience, instantaneous and profound.
O cheeses that dance in the moonlight, cheeses
that mingle with sausages, cheeses of Stonehenge.
O cheeses that are shy, that linger in the doorway,
eyes looking down, cheeses spectacular as fireworks.
Reblochon openly sexual; Caerphilly like pine trees, small
at the timberline; Port du Salut in love; Caprice des Dieux
eloquent, tactful, like a thousand-year-old hostess;
and Dolcelatte, always generous to a fault.
O village of cheeses, I make you this poem of cheeses,
O family of cheeses, living together in pantries,
O cheeses that keep to your own nature, like a lucky couple,
this solitude, this energy, these bodies slowly dying.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Donald Hall (born 1928) was the first poetry editor of The Paris Review. He served as United States Poet Laureate (2006-2007) and has been the recipient of many award and honors, including Guggenheim Fellowships, designation as Poet Laureate of New Hampshire (198401989), National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, Los Angeles Times Book Prize in poetry, and the National Medal of Arts (2010).

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CHEESE HAIKI

by Deb Install 

Please give me some cheese

Hard, soft, strong, weak — all are fine

Don’t forget the wine.

Visit the poet’s Twitter page here.

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CHEESE POEM: THE MOON

By Oliver Herford

The Moon is like a big round cheese

That shines above the garden trees,


And like a cheese grows less each night,
     

As though some one had had a bite.
 


 

The Mouse delights to nibble cheese,
     

The Dog bites anything he sees —


But how could they bite off the Moon
     

Unless they went in a balloon?
 


 

And Human People, when they eat
     

They think it rude to bite their meat,


They use a Knife or Fork or Spoon;
     

Who is it then that bites the moon?

Photo: “Yellow Full Moon” by Faiza, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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While browsing through some quotes this morning, I came across this one:

“The poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.” G.K. CHESTERTON

This sent my mind in a couple of different directions. I wondered how many (if any poems) had been written about cheese. And, second, I remembered today is a Friday in Lent and, according to AmericanCatholic.org, “all Catholics 14 years or older must abstain from meat on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and all the Fridays of Lent.” As a vegetarian, this hasn’t crossed my mind in a while, but I often think about my prevegetarian days, growing up when we didn’t eat meat on Friday — any Friday.

On those Fridays, we lived on several staples — tuna casserole, fish sticks, tuna salad, egg salad, and, my personal favorites, grilled cheese sandwiches and macaroni and cheese.

Some years back, I wrote a history of Kraft Foods products — including three chapters about cheese (natural cheese, process cheese, and cream cheese). So this background puts me in a unique position to serve as your curator of cheese (but not cheesy) poetry. Here we go…

ODE TO CHEESE

by Life Poetry

Ode to Cheese, 


Which makes us smile, 


When cameras go clack.


Ode to Cheese, 


Which make us taste,


The greatest of flavors,

the wackiest of whack.


Ode to Cheese, 


Blue, Gorgonzola, 


American and Cheddar.


Ode to Cheese, 


Beja and Feta, 


In all types of weather.


Ode to Cheese, 


For those on a diet, 


or trying to get fatter.


Ode to Cheese, 


with crackers and wine, 


with grapes can flatter.


Ode to Cheese, 


when you’re sad and happy, 


Cheese just fits.


Ode To Cheese, 


Mountains and mountains, 


or bits and bits.



Ode to Cheese, 


To appreciate, 


eat, 


and take pictures.