Archives for posts with tag: Dennis Hopper

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“I think of my photographs as ‘found’ paintings because I don’t crop them, I don’t manipulate them or anything. So they’re like ‘found’ objects to me.”

DENNIS HOPPER

Photo: “Double Standard” by Dennis Hopper (1961), Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York

Note: Dennis Hopper shot “Double Standard” from a convertible stopped at the intersection of Santa Monica Boulevard, Melrose Avenue, and Doheny Drive. A Los Angeles Times article following Hopper’s death on May 29, 2010 celebrated his work as a photographer and called the above image, “…an icon of the era, an exemplar of car culture cool…a delectably dense urban moment.”

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While shooting Rebel Without a Cause (1955), Dennis Hopper and James Dean became good friends. (Hopper was 19 and Dean was 24 when they shot the movie during the spring of 1955.)  Dean served as an artistic mentor to his friend — and gave Hopper his first camera, encouraging him to take it everywhere and shoot everything. Rebel was released in October 1955 —  a month after James Dean’s death in a car crash. Hopper was devastated by Dean’s passing — but paid tribute to his memory by applying himself to the art of photography. And a fine photographer he was, as evidenced by the above 1965 self-portrait. Hopper passed away in 2010 at age 74.

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During the past few months, we’ve written posts about Dennis Hopper‘s love of photography. These include several posts about his iconic photograph “Double Standard” and a post about his self-portraits. We’ve noted that much of the daily traffic to the Silver Birch Press blog comes through search engines — and every day people are searching for articles about Dennis Hopper, photographer.

While visiting San Francisco in 1964, Hopper shot the photo reproduced above. Called “The only ism for me is Abstract Expressionism,” the photo speaks volumes about Hopper and the owner of the Plymouth with license plate JQR661.

Hopper’s photos are often witty and filled with irony — and this one is no exception — and he seems to revel in the bumper sticker’s proclamation that, for some, art takes the place of politics, philosophy, and religion. In 1964, most of the people who felt this way drove old (this model is probably from the late 1940s or early 1950s) cars and were proud of it!

For the record, the leading abstract expressionist artists were Jackson Pollack, Willem de Kooning, and Mark Rothko.

Photo: “The only ism for me is abstract expressionism” by Dennis Hopper, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

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Yesterday, we posted a Dennis Hopper self-portrait from 1961 (see below) and talked about his lifelong love affair with photography. The above self-portrait was shot more than forty years later — when he was still one cool-looking gent. Hopper passed away in 2010 at age 74. His love of art was legendary — as was his art collection.

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While shooting Rebel Without a Cause (1955), Dennis Hopper and James Dean became good friends. (Hopper was 19 and Dean was 24 when they shot the movie during the spring of 1955.)  Dean served as something of an artistic mentor to his friend — and gave Hopper his first camera, encouraging him to take it with him everywhere and shoot everything. Rebel was released in October 1955 —  a month after James Dean’s death in a car crash. Hopper was devastated by Dean’s passing — but paid tribute to his memory by applying himself to the art of photography. And a fine photographer he was, as evidenced by the above 1965 self-portrait.

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Earlier today, we posted “Double Standard,” a 1961 Dennis Hopper photo of the intersection of Santa Monica, Doheny, and Melrose in Beverly Hills, California. The above screen grab from Google maps shows how the spot looks in 2012. For comparison, Dennis Hopper’s photo is repeated below.

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“I think of my photographs as ‘found’ paintings because I don’t crop them, I don’t manipulate them or anything. So they’re like ‘found’ objects to me.”

DENNIS HOPPER

Photo: “Double Standard” by Dennis Hopper (1961), Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York

Note: Dennis Hopper shot this photo from a convertible stopped at the intersection of Santa Monica Boulevard, Melrose Avenue, and Doheny Drive. A Los Angeles Times article following Hopper’s death on May 29, 2010 celebrated his work as a photographer and called the above image, “…an icon of the era, an exemplar of car culture cool…a delectably dense urban moment.”