Archives for posts with tag: fitness

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Flexagility
by Mike Dailey

I can bend at the waist, put my head between knees
See what’s in my back pocket and do that with ease
I can criss-cross my legs and then walk on my hands
I can stand on a ball and juggle six pans
I can place a broom handle on the tip of my nose
And keep it upright while I count all my toes
I can spin on my head maybe six times or more
While bouncing a basketball all over the floor
I can run up a wall, do a back flip and then
Run back up the wall and do it again
I can put both my ankles in back of my head
Then bounce from my chair all the way to my bed
I can unhinge my jaw put my fist in my mouth
I can stare towards the north with my feet walking south
I can do all these things but the thing I can’t do
Get a picture of me doing these things for you

PHOTO: Fred Astaire dancing on the walls and ceiling in Royal Wedding (1951).

NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR: I liked the challenge of finding something I could not do but wish that I could. At 67 years old, I am not as flexible as I once was, and I was never as flexible or as agile as I always wanted to be. With that in mind, I just started putting down all the flexible and coordinated things that I would have done to impress the ladies had I been able to do so in my youth.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Mike Dailey lives in Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina. He is a teller of stories in rhythm and rhyme. He has been writing poetry most of his life and has three published books of his poems with a fourth on the way. He leaves the introspective, deep personal poetry to others while he concentrates his poems on the interesting and often odd happening stories that most people overlook.

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MY BODY
by Peter Valentine

Look out from my body and see people standing, talking, hanging out—from a window two women having a dream. Is it fantastic? Of course it is. It’s compulsory. When I was playing soccer at the age of 14, the first thing we’d do before going out onto the field would be to climb up on one another’s thighs and massage the legs. Now it’s 1970 and there are street guys, there are punks, gays, beach bums just lying around in the sun. My body is there too, hanging out, talking to women. I don’t look at women the same way I look at myself. I look at myself and I look at myself looking at women. I realize my body in the world, that there’s never been my body before. I probably should play the victim.

SOURCE: Conversation with Arnold Schwarzenegger by Peter Manso (Oui magazine, August 1977).

IMAGE: Arnold Schwarzenegger, bodybuilder (circa 1975).

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Peter Valentine writes a daily poem from words found in the New York Times crossword puzzle. He posts them daily on Tumblr and on Facebook.

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WHERE HAVE YOU GONE, T.S. ELIOT?
by Gerald Locklin

In the aerobics room,
Going nowhere on my treadmill,
While watching a beefy colleague
Climb stairs while remaining in place,
It occurs to me that maybe
What we have instead of 
St. John of the Cross,
The dark night of the soul,
And the subsequent ascent of Mount Carmel,
Is the stepmaster machine.

Drawing: “Relativity” (1953) by M.C. Escher

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WHERE HAVE YOU GONE, T.S. ELIOT?

Poem by Gerald Locklin

In the aerobics room,

Going nowhere on my treadmill,

While watching a beefy colleague

Climb stairs while remaining in place,

It occurs to me that maybe

What we have instead of 

St. John of the Cross,

The dark night of the soul,

And the subsequent ascent of Mount Carmel,

Is the stepmaster machine.

Drawing: “Relativity” (1953) by M.C. Escher