Archives for posts with tag: fun

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The makers of the original Magnetic Poetry Kit present Beat Poet, a magnetic poetry kit with over 200 hep cat word magnets. This box of words really zings, daddy-o, and celebrates one of America’s best known literary movements. The kit includes words like jazz, generation, road, bohemian, freedom . . . and many more! Find a complete list of words here. Kit contains over 200 themed magnetic word tiles — all for just $11.95. To order, visit magneticpoetry.com. To create a poem online from the original kit, visit this link. If you do, please send a copy to silver@silverbirchpress.com.

ImageSilver Birch Press is seeking April Fool’s Day Erasure Poetry based on page 41 from a book of the poet’s choice — interpret “April Fool’s Day” as you will (humor, trickery, thoughts on the day, but nothing x-rated or raw). Find out more about erasure poetry at wavepoetry.com and geist.comI like this prompt because at some point we’ve all felt like fools, have been fooled, or have fooled someone else — so the resulting poems will be either humorous or emotional (my favorite types of poetry).

As a prompt, here are definitions of “fool”:

Noun: A person who acts unwisely; a silly person.

Verb: Trick or deceive.

Adjective: Foolish or silly.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

In honor of April Fool’s Day (4/1), Silver Birch Press is accepting submissions of erasure poems based on page 41 from a book of your choice. For examples of erasure poetry, see this link.

1. Select a book and turn to page 41 (in honor of April Fool’s Day, 4/1).

2. Photocopy the page, then mark out, white out, circle, or in some other way (see examples), eliminate some of the words. The remaining words constitute your April Fool’s Day Erasure Poem. (You may submit up to three poems, each created from page 41 of a different book — or even the same book, if you are so inclined.) Make sure the page number (41) appears in the poem (meaning, don’t cross out the page number). Also make sure that all the deleted words are completely obscured. 

3. Give your poem a title.

4. Scan (or take a photo of) your marked-up copy and create a PDF or JPG file. (We prefer files of at least 1MB, but will accept lower-resolution files.)

5. Create a separate typed version in MSWord or in an email.

6. Send an email with your erasure poetry to silver@silverbirchpress.com along with your name, mailing address, one-paragraph bio, and the Title, publisher, and publication date of the book.

DEADLINE:  March 15, 2014

We will feature submissions on the Silver Birch Press blog — and in a printed collection entitled Silver Birch Press By the Numbers Erasure Poetry Anthology, which we’ll release in the fall of 2014. 

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EGGS RATED
by Shel Silverstein 

These eggs
Are eggscellent.
I’m not eggsaggerating.
You can tell by my eggspression
They’re eggceptional —
Eggstra fluffy,
Eggstremely tasty,
Cooked eggsactly right
By an eggspert
With lots of eggsperience.
Now I’ll eggsamine the bill….
Ooh — much more eggspensive
Than I eggspected.
I gotta get out of here.
Where’s the eggxit?

SOURCE: “Eggs Rated” appears in Shel Silverstein’s collection Falling Up (HarperCollins, 1996), available at Amazon.com.

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Silver Birch Press is seeking April Fool’s Day Erasure Poetry based on page 41 from a book of the poet’s choice — interpret “April Fool’s Day” as you will (humor, trickery, thoughts on the day, but nothing x-rated or raw). Find out more about erasure poetry at wavepoetry.com and geist.comI like this prompt because at some point we’ve all felt like fools, have been fooled, or have fooled someone else — so the resulting poems will be either humorous or emotional (my favorite types of poetry).

As a prompt, here are definitions of “fool”:

Noun: A person who acts unwisely; a silly person.

Verb: Trick or deceive.

Adjective: Foolish or silly.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

In honor of April Fool’s Day (4/1), Silver Birch Press is accepting submissions of erasure poems based on page 41 from a book of your choice. For examples of erasure poetry, see this link.

1. Select a book and turn to page 41 (in honor of April Fool’s Day, 4/1).

2. Photocopy the page, then mark out, white out, circle, or in some other way (see examples), eliminate some of the words. The remaining words constitute your April Fool’s Day Erasure Poem. (You may submit up to three poems, each created from page 41 of a different book — or even the same book, if you are so inclined.) Make sure the page number (41) appears in the poem (meaning, don’t cross out the page number). Also make sure that all the deleted words are completely obscured. 

3. Give your poem a title.

4. Scan (or take a photo of) your marked-up copy and create a PDF or JPG file. (We prefer files of at least 1MB, but will accept lower-resolution files.)

5. Create a separate typed version in MSWord or in an email.

6. Send an email with your erasure poetry to silver@silverbirchpress.com along with your name, mailing address, one-paragraph bio, and the Title, publisher, and publication date of the book.

DEADLINE:  March 15, 2014

We will feature submissions on the Silver Birch Press blog — and in a printed collection entitled Silver Birch Press By the Numbers Erasure Poetry Anthology, which we’ll release in the fall of 2014. 

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“A child who does not play is not a child, but the man who does not play has lost forever the child who lived in him and whom he will miss terribly.” PABLO NERUDA

Illustration: Wall Art in Valparaiso, Chile — photo by Janet Rudolph, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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CAPTION: “I wasn’t texting. I was building this ship in a bottle.”

CREDIT: New Yorker cartoon by Robert Leighton, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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Silver Birch Press is seeking April Fool’s Day Erasure Poetry based on page 41 from a book of the poet’s choice — interpret “April Fool’s Day” as you will (humor, trickery, thoughts on the day, but nothing x-rated or raw). Find out more about erasure poetry at wavepoetry.com and geist.com. I like this prompt because at some point we’ve all felt like fools, have been fooled, or have fooled someone else — so the resulting poems will be either humorous or emotional (my favorite types of poetry).

As a prompt, here are definitions of “fool”:

Noun: A person who acts unwisely; a silly person.

Verb: Trick or deceive.

Adjective: Foolish or silly.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

In honor of April Fool’s Day (4/1), Silver Birch Press is accepting submissions of erasure poems based on page 41 from a book of your choice. For examples of erasure poetry, see this link.

1. Select a book and turn to page 41 (in honor of April Fool’s Day, 4/1).

2. Photocopy the page, then mark out, white out, circle, or in some other way (see examples), eliminate some of the words. The remaining words constitute your April Fool’s Day Erasure Poem. (You may submit up to three poems, each created from page 41 of a different book.)

3. Give your poem a title.

4. Scan (or take a photo of) your marked-up copy and create a PDF or JPG file. (We prefer files of at least 1MB, but will accept lower-resolution files.)

5. Create a separate typed version in MSWord or in an email.

6. Send an email with your erasure poetry to silver@silverbirchpress.com along with your name, contact information, one-paragraph bio, and the Title, edition, and page number of the book.

DEADLINE:  March 1, 2014

We will feature submissions on the Silver Birch Press blog — and possibly in a printed collection. We hope to pair the April Fool’s Day Erasure Poetry with our recent Valentine’s Day Erasure Poetry submissions in a published book later this year. 

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CREDIT: New Yorker cartoon by Bob Mankoff, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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HAPPY NEW
by Shel Silverstein (1930-1999)

Joe yelled, “Happy New Year.”

The cow yelled, “Happy Moo Year.”

The ghost yelled, “Happy Boo Year.”

The doctor yelled, “Happy Flu Year.”

The penguin sneezed, “Happy Ah-choo Year.”

The skunk yelled, “Happy Pee-yoo Year.”

The owl hooted, “Happy Too-woo Year.”

The cowboy yelled, “Happy Yahoo Year.”

The trainman yelled, “Happy Choo-choo year.”

The clock man yelled, “Happy Cuckoo Year.”

The barefoot man yelled, “Happy Shoe Year.”

The hungry man said, “Happy Chew Year.”

There were more “Happy Ooo-Years”

Than you ever heard

At our New Year’s party…

Last June twenty-third.
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“Happy New” appears in Shel Silverstein‘s posthumous collection Everything on It (HarperCollins, 2011), available at Amazon.com.

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WRITER WAITING
by Shel Silverstein

Oh this shiny new computer–
There just isn’t nothin’ cuter.
It knows everything the world ever knew.
And with this great computer
I don’t need no writin’ tutor,
‘Cause there ain’t a single thing that it can’t do.
It can sort and it can spell,
It can punctuate as well.
It can find and file and underline and type.
It can edit and select,
It can copy and correct,
So I’ll have a whole book written by tonight
(Just as soon as it can think of what to write).

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“Writer Waiting” appears in Falling Up, poems and drawings by Shel Silverstein (HarperCollins, 1996), available at Amazon.com. (And I recommend that everyone have a personal copy of this delightful book.)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Chicago native Shel Silverstein (1930-1999) was a poet, songwriter, singer, cartoonist, screenwriter, and author. Other notable books include The Giving Tree (1964), Where the Sidewalk Ends (1974), and the song “A Boy Named Sue,”  made famous by Johnny Cash.