Archives for posts with tag: green

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“Green is the prime color of the world, and that from which its loveliness arises.”

PEDRO CALDERON DE LA BARCA, Spanish poet, dramatist, and priest (1600-1681)

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GREEN CREEK
by Wang Wei (Translated by Henry Hughes and Jin Lei)

To find the Yellow Flower River
One follows the waters of Green Creek
Through the mountains in ten-thousand turns.
But only a few miles, at most.
Sounds drown among the wild rocks,
And colors quiet within deep pines.
Water chestnuts bob lightly.
And reeds and rushes shine
In the clear, stilling waters.
My heart and the river are equally at peace.
Let me sit upon a large, flat rock
And drop my line and hook forever.

Photo: “Green Water Reflection, Blackstone River, Lincoln, Rhode Island” by Sheba53, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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SHADES OF GREEN
by TERE SIEVERS

Dusty taste of pistachio
summons the desert,
after the bite
green like the Palo Verde.
Creamy avocado
so smooth on the tongue,
soft in the hand but
hard in the heart.
A sting of Chartreuse
in a sip of the tongue,
burning bite from a bottle.
Now, breathe eucalyptus
inhale mint grass pine
swallow apple olive
drink in green.
 
Electric, asparagus, yellow, blue
forest, bright, marine and pine
Harlequin, honeydew, India, lawn
camouflage, citrine, emerald, jade
Paris, army, avocado, pear
verdigris, chlorine, office, sky
hunter, Persian, pigment, teal
turquoise, Kelly, moss and sap
Eucalyptus, grass, viridian, green.

“Shades of Green” by Tere Sievers appears in the Silver Birch Press Green Anthology, a collection of Poetry and prose by 72 writers from the U.S., U.K., Europe, and Africa —  available at Amazon.com. (Free Kindle version until 3/18/14!)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tere Sievers, originally a Jersey girl, lives in Long Beach, California, and works as a Marriage and Family Therapist.  She began writing poetry at CSULB and Beyond Baroque back in the late 70s.  For the enjoyment of the children in her life, she has published a book of children’s poems, Blueberry Pancakes and Monkey Pajamas.  She received third place in the Your Daily Poem Apocalypse Poetry Contest.

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GREEN CORN TAMALES
by Gerald Locklin

First in Tucson,
Now at El Cholo in L.A.
On western just south of Olympic,
My wife and I make a point
Of enjoying them once a summer.
 
Some tamales are not hot.
These are sweet with the syrup
Of young corn, steamed within
The husks.  Even the thin strand
Of a green pepper seems sweet.
Even the morsel of tender chicken
Seems sweet.
 
Sweet as sweethearts
On the evening promenade
Above the beach at Mazatlan.
Sweet as summer evenings.
Sweet as the respite, the
Renewal, at the end of day.
 
Think sweetly of green corn tamales,
Remembering that the water of the desert,
Hoarded by the thirsty cactus,
Is the sweetest water.

Reprinted by permission of the author from The Life Force Poems, © Gerald Locklin, 2002, Water Row Press, Sudbury, Massachusetts.

“Green Corn Tamales” by Gerald Locklin appears in the  Silver Birch Press Green Anthology: An Eclectic Collection of Poetry & Prose. The anthology includes poetry, short stories, essays, novel excerpts, and stage play scenes that touch on “green” in one way or another. The Silver Birch Press Green Anthology is available at Amazon.com (free Kindle version until 12/21/13).

Photo: El Cholo, Los Angeles. Visit the restaurant online at elcholo.com.

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WOMAN WITH A GREEN OLIVE, FLOATING
by Lori McGinn

Mom,
Do you remember?
There was that time
You were all fashion savvy,
With your martini,
your fancy cigarette holder?
Pall Mall cigarette poised.
There was a pool, a party,
Me, at the bottom of the pool
looking up, wondering when to breathe.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Lori McGinn is a mom, grandma, baker of cookies, visual artist, and writer of poems. A native of Whittier, California, her work has appeared in several anthologies and her chapbook, Waiting, was published as a part of the Laguna Poets Series.
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“Woman with a Green Olive, Floating” and other poetry by Lori McGinn appears in the Silver Birch Press Green Anthology — a collection of poetry and prose from more than 70 authors around the world — available at Amazon.com (free Kindle version until 12/21/13).

Photo: “Classic Martini” by Ken Johnson, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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SHADES OF GREEN
by TERE SIEVERS

Dusty taste of pistachio
summons the desert,
after the bite
green like the Palo Verde.
Creamy avocado
so smooth on the tongue,
soft in the hand but
hard in the heart.
A sting of Chartreuse
in a sip of the tongue,
burning bite from a bottle.
Now, breathe eucalyptus
inhale mint grass pine
swallow apple olive
drink in green.
 
Electric, asparagus, yellow, blue
forest, bright, marine and pine
Harlequin, honeydew, India, lawn
camouflage, citrine, emerald, jade
Paris, army, avocado, pear
verdigris, chlorine, office, sky
hunter, Persian, pigment, teal
turquoise, Kelly, moss and sap
Eucalyptus, grass, viridian, green.

“Shades of Green” by Tere Sievers appears in the Silver Birch Press Green Anthology, a collection of Poetry and prose by 72 writers from the U.S., U.K., Europe, and Africa —  available at Amazon.com. (Free Kindle version until 12/21/13!)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tere Sievers, originally a Jersey girl, lives in Long Beach, California, and works as a Marriage and Family Therapist.  She began writing poetry at CSULB and Beyond Baroque back in the late 70s.  For the enjoyment of the children in her life, she has published a book of children’s poems, Blueberry Pancakes and Monkey Pajamas.  She received third place in the Your Daily Poem Apocalypse Poetry Contest.

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GREEN CREEK
by Wang Wei (Translated by Henry Hughes and Jin Lei)

To find the Yellow Flower River
One follows the waters of Green Creek
Through the mountains in ten-thousand turns.
But only a few miles, at most.
Sounds drown among the wild rocks,
And colors quiet within deep pines.
Water chestnuts bob lightly.
And reeds and rushes shine
In the clear, stilling waters.
My heart and the river are equally at peace.
Let me sit upon a large, flat rock
And drop my line and hook forever.

Photo: “Green Water Reflection, Blackstone River, Lincoln, Rhode Island” by Sheba53, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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AQUA VITA
by Dale Sprowl

A color of aqua lives,
fantastically far from real;
Once I saw it behind Pablo Neruda’s house
in a dream,
a stripe of Chilean ocean, cool and green.
Another time,
though this one real,
I saw it at the beach on Aruba,
Blown with racing winds,
sea over shallow white sand
pale as a pool.
Once I found it in nature
as I stared down at ice floes on Greenland,
white chunks cut into black lake,
each framed by numinous liquid refreshment.

And another time I saw it.
Would you call it real or not?
In Vincent’s sky in “The White Orchard.”
When I saw it,
I wept,
uncontained,
until I saw it again in “The Plow”
and knew I was at home there.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Dale Sprowl teaches writing at Biola University in La Mirada, California. During summers, she administrates and teaches at the Young Writer’s Project at UCI. Her work with the UCI Writing Project began in 1981, and she has contributed to the UCIWP texts on the teaching of writing. Her first chapbook of poems, The Colors of Water, published by Finishing Line Press in 2007, and her second chapbook, Moon Over Continent’s Edge (2009), have been nominated for a California Book Award. Her poems have also appeared in PEARL, Fire, A New Song, Ancient Paths, and Knowing Stones: Poems of Exotic Places. She earned her bachelor’s degree in humanities and in history as well as a master’s degree in history from Pepperdine University. An Educator Associate for the American Psychoanalytic Association, she lives in Newport Beach, California, with her husband.

“Aqua Vita” and other poetry by Dale Sprowl appears in the Silver Birch Press Green Anthology, a collection of poetry & prose from authors around the world — available at Amazon.com.

Painting: “The White Orchard” by Vincent van Gogh (1888)

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GREEN CREEK
by Wang Wei (Translated by Henry Hughes and Jin Lei)

To find the Yellow Flower River
One follows the waters of Green Creek
Through the mountains in ten-thousand turns.
But only a few miles, at most.
Sounds drown among the wild rocks,
And colors quiet within deep pines.
Water chestnuts bob lightly.
And reeds and rushes shine
In the clear, stilling waters.
My heart and the river are equally at peace.
Let me sit upon a large, flat rock
And drop my line and hook forever.

Photo: “Green Water Reflection, Blackstone River, Lincoln, Rhode Island” by Sheba53, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Image

GREEN CREEK

by Wang Wei (Translated by Henry Hughes and Jin Lei)

To find the Yellow Flower River

One follows the waters of Green Creek

Through the mountains in ten-thousand turns.

But only a few miles, at most.

Sounds drown among the wild rocks,

And colors quiet within deep pines.

Water chestnuts bob lightly.

And reeds and rushes shine

In the clear, stilling waters.

My heart and the river are equally at peace.

Let me sit upon a large, flat rock

And drop my line and hook forever.

Photo: “Green Water Reflection, Blackstone River, Lincoln, Rhode Island” by Sheba53, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED