Archives for posts with tag: Hunter S. Thompson

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“I find that by putting things in writing I can understand them and see them a little more objectively . . . For words are merely tools and if you use the right ones you can actually put even your life in order, if you don’t lie to yourself and use the wrong words.” HUNTER S. THOMPSON

EDITOR’S NOTE: Hunter S. Thompson has been called many things — he has avid fans (Tom Wolfe called him “the greatest American comic writer of the 20th century”) and rabid detractors (Flavorwire.com recently lumped him in with its “most irrationally hated writers”). But whether you love him or hate him, today marks Hunter S. Thompson’s 76th birthday. Cheers!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Hunter Stockton Thompson (1937- 2005) was an American journalist and author who rose to prominence with the publication of Hell’s Angels: The Strange and Terrible Saga of the Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs (1967).  He became a counterculture figure with his own brand of New Journalism he termed “Gonzo,” an experimental style of journalism where reporters involve themselves in the action and become central figures in their stories. Thompson remains best known for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream (1972), a rumination on the failure of the 1960s counterculture movement, first serialized in Rolling Stone, and in 1998 released as a film starring Johnny Depp. (Read more at Wikipedia.org)

Portrait of Hunter S. Thompson by Jeff Morgan, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED, Used by Permission

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Happy “diamond” birthday to Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005) — who graced readers with his wit, humor, and originality for the brief time he joined us on this planet.

Photo: Zen Sutherland