Archives for posts with tag: Leonardo da Vinci

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THE WORLD IS IN PENCIL
by Todd Boss

—not pen. It’s got

that same silken
dust about it, doesn’t it,

that same sense of
having been roughed

onto paper even
as it was planned.

It had to be a labor
of love. It must’ve

taken its author some
time, some shove.

I’ll bet it felt good
in the hand—the o
 
of the ocean, and
the and and the and

of the land.

IMAGE: Landscape drawing by Leonardo da Vinci (1473)

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Todd Boss grew up on a cattle farm in Wisconsin, and was educated at St. Olaf College and the University of Alaska Anchorage, where he received an MFA. His first poetry collection, Yellowrocket (2008), was named one of the 10 best poetry books of 2008 by Virginia Quarterly Review and was a finalist for the Minnesota Book Award. His second book, Pitch (2012) won the Midwest Booksellers’ Choice Award for Poetry. His honors include the Emily Clark Balch Prize for Poetry from Virginia Quarterly Review and the Glenna Luschei Prairie Schooner Award. He has also received several Pushcart Prize nominations, a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, and a residency with the Ragdale Foundation. His poetry has been featured on National Public Radio and in former U.S. poet laureate Ted Kooser’s newspaper column, “American Life in Poetry.” 

Boss is the founding editor of Flurry, an online poetry journal, co-founder of Motionpoems, a non-profit poetry film initiative, and a founding member of the book marketing think-team Squad 365. He lives in Saint Paul with his family.

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Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt. Poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.”

LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452-1519)

Painting: “La Scapigliata” (woman’s head) by Leonardo da Vinci, oil on panel (1508), currently housed at Galeria Nazionale di Parma.

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“Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt. Poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen.” LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452-1519)

Painting: “La Scapigliata” (woman’s head) by Leonardo da Vinci, oil on panel (1508), currently housed at Galeria Nazionale di Parma.

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Today, we’re featuring another entry (at right) from The Ceclia Prize contest — this one by Twitter @srqu, who has created a triple triptych in the colors and style of Andy Warhol. (See below for Warhol’s triple triptych — is there a word for this? — of Marilyn Monroe.)

As most readers know, The Cecilia Prize honors Cecilia Gimenez, the amateur art restorer who has gained international attention by trying to repair a fresco of Christ’s face on the wall of the local Catholic church in Borja, Spain. A gallery of Cecilia Prize entries is available here. 

On our blog, we are only featuring entries inspired by the work of esteemed artists — to date, Rene Magritte, Leonardo da Vinci, and Andy Warhol.

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As we mentioned yesterday, Cecilia Gimenez — the octogenarian who botched a fresco restoration at a Catholic church in Borja, Spain — continues to inspire creativity across the globe. People are saying to themselves, “If she’s an artist, so am I!” To give this burgeoning talent pool an outlet for artistic expression, some people (I’m assuming they’re British because of the way they spell “honour”) have set up The Cecilia Prize — for “all the fixers out there,” as the website states.

Included in this post is another fine entry, Ecce Mona (by Twtter @psycher0s). As an art history refresher, we will remind readers that Mona Lisa was painted by Leonardo da Vinci some time between 1503 and 1506. Leonardo created what is now probably the world’s most famous painting in oil on a poplar panel. It is now on display at the Louvre Museum in Paris.

A friend once told me that when she’d visited the Louvre, she was disappointed at the Mona Lisa because “it was so small.” When my turn to see the painting in person finally arrived, I knew what to anticipate. I remember the room was crowded and no photos were allowed. Somehow, I wedged my way to the front of the onlookers. Seeing the Mona Lisa is like most other lifetime milestones — something you never forget. And, for the record, here are the painting’s dimensions: 77 cm x 53 cm, or 30 inches x 21 inches.

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Unless you’ve sworn off the news during the past few days, you’re familiar with Cecilia Gimenez, the 81-year-old attempting to shave off a few Purgatory points by doing some good works — in this case, restoring a 19th century fresco of Christ on the wall of her church in Borja, Spain.

For the record (and this is why I’m not showing how she ruined the icon), this blog assiduously avoids discussions of religion or politics — that’s not our territory. But I couldn’t resist commenting on this story — there are so many levels and layers to it.

First, it’s a fine example when your children ask, “What does it mean when someone says ‘the road to hell is paved with good intentions’?”

Second, it shows the value of getting regular eye checkups. I have to wonder if Cecelia Gimenez has cataracts. Before her cataract operation, my mother could not distinguish yellow from white or brown from purple. She had the front door of her house painted a Barney purple, thinking it was “umber” (true story, and I have the photos to prove it!).

Third, I’m wondering if the other parishioners stopped Cecilia Gimenez before she was finished with her work. (You know how messy works-in-progress can look!)

Finally, I feel this story expresses the importance of art education — and why we need to support funding for the arts (hey, that sounds political).

Cecilia Gimenez refuses to repent for her sins (mortal? venial?) and appears belligerent, arrogant, self-satisfied, defiant, and convinced her work is beautiful. Wait a minute. She sounds like most of the artists I know. Welcome to the club, Cecilia!

Articles about this art restoration debacle have swept the Internet — but my favorite is a piece at hyperallergic.com called “Octogenarian Restorer Strikes Again.” The brilliantly written article imagines what Cecilia Gimenez could accomplish if allowed to restore some of the world’s art treasures, including Andy Warhol‘s portrait of Elizabeth Taylor  (below), Munch’s “The Scream,” Van Gogh‘s self-portrait, Vermeer‘s “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” and Leonardo‘s “Mona Lisa.”

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