Archives for posts with tag: mothers and sons

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The Quiet Door
by Shelly Blankman

No one knocks at my front door anymore.
My house is an empty nest. My children
both grown, out of state, leading lives of
their own now.

I miss all the times they’d slam the door
so hard I thought the hinges would shatter.
Or the times I’d have to remind them
to close the door behind them so the cats
wouldn’t escape.

No more pounding by their friends to see if
they want to swim laps in the neighborhood pool,
or build forts in fresh-fallen snow, or trudge through
a muddy stream they’d just discovered.

My front door is now just a plain old, putrid-green, chipped-paint door now. A quiet door.

A painfully, eerily quiet door.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Shelly Blankman and her husband, Jon, are empty nesters who live in Columbia, Maryland. They have two sons, Richard and Joshua, who live in New York and Texas, respectively. Shelly and Jon fill their empty nest with two cat rescues and a foster dog. Following a career in public relations and journalism, Shelly has returned to her first love, writing poetry. She also enjoys making memory books and greeting cards and, of course, refereeing pets. Richard and Joshua surprised her by publishing her first book of poetry, Pumpkinhead, in December 2019.

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MOTEL CHRONICLES (Excerpt)

Story by Sam Shepard

…We stopped on the prairie at a place with huge white plaster dinosaurs standing around in a circle. There was no town. Just these dinosaurs with lights shining up at them from the ground.

My mother carried my around in a brown Army blanket humming a slow tune. I think it was “Peg a’ My Heart.” She hummed it very softly to herself. Like her thoughts were far away.

We weaved slowly in and out through the dinosaurs. Through their legs. Under their bellies. Circling the Brontosaurus. Staring up at the teeth of Tyrannosaurus Rex. They all had these little blue lights for eyes.

There were no people around. Just us and the dinosaurs.

PHOTO: Dinosaur Park, Rapid City, South Dakota, 1945 (April K. Hanson, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)