Archives for posts with tag: National Poetry Month

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It’s still April — and it’s still National Poetry Month in the United States. The American Academy of Poets has developed a list of 30 ways to celebrate. One of the suggestions is to memorize a poem. Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare is a perfect candidate — because it’s “short…with a strong rhythmic underpinning” as the National Poetry Month site suggests.

SONNET 18
by William Shakespeare

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

NOTE: “Sonnet 18” and other summer-related poetry and prose from over 70 authors appears in the Silver Birch Press Summer Anthology, available at Amazon.com.

IMAGE: 2014 National Poetry Month poster by Chip Kidd.

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Jimfoolery
by Stuart Barnes

flowers

, George

, all day long

SOURCE: “Jimfoolery” by Stuart Barnes is based on page 41 of A Single Man by Christopher Isherwood (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013).

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Stuart Barnes was born in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. His poems and creative non-fiction have appeared or are forthcoming in The Warwick Review, Poetry Ireland Review, Assaracus: A Journal of Gay Poetry, The Nervous Breakdown, Southerly Journal, Going Down Swinging, Out of Sequence: The Sonnets Remixed, Mascara Literary Review and Verity La, amongst others. He is poetry editor of Tincture Journal and can be followed on Twitter @StuartABarnes.

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PERFECTION
by Candace Butler

they went in search of purity
they commonly party several hours each morning
 
day and night
they battle weakness, confusion, and despair.
 
their sweet human absurdity
reached the North Pole
 
they must adapt to limitations
they must adapt to compromise
 
every move can carry eighteen years’ preparation
why not feel a little

SOURCE: “Perfection” by Candace Butler is based on page 41 Teaching a Stone to Talk: Expeditions and Encounters by Annie Dillard (HarperPerennial, 1982).

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Candace Butler is a writer and artist living in her hometown of Sugar Grove, Virginia, a small town in the Appalachian Mountains. She is an MFA candidate at Antioch University of Los Angeles and is co-poetry editor of Lunch Ticket.

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Swimming Home
by Scott Stoller

The boy becomes his father,
sneaking furtive walks before daylight,
smoking Burmas,
dreams of swimming home,
nothing to be gained
by pretending otherwise,
heaps curses on the rogues and idiots.
Everything is their fault,
right down to the fume soaked atmosphere
of their tiny cabin.

SOURCE: “Swimming Home” by Scott Stoller is based on page 41 of Absolute Friends by John LeCarré (Little Brown, 2003).

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Scott Stoller’s work has appeared in many online and print journals and anthologies including Weave, decomP, Prick of the Spindle, and Best Contemporary Tanka. He’s a physician in the west suburbs of Chicago.

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The Box
by Eric Otto

The familiar nerve
tightened and twanged.
He grew back a little, expected
stones to come flying out of the box,
could feel that this was something
different. But he just had to look inside.
 
He squinted in,
looked down at the water
nervously.

SOURCE: “The Box” by Eric Otto is based on page 41 of The Long Tomorrow by Leigh Brackett (Ballantine, 1955,1974).

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Eric Otto‘s poems have recently appeared in A Hundred Gourds, Red River Review, Scifaikuest, Stymie, Word Riot, and other places. Two of his poems received honorable mentions in The Found Poetry Review‘s 2013 Dog-Ear Poetry Contest. He is an associate professor of environmental humanities at Florida Gulf Coast University.

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Happy 449th birthday to William Shakespeare, born April 23, 1564. (Interesting fact: Shakespeare also died on April 23 — in 1616, at age 52.)

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We are currently editing the Silver Birch Press SUMMER ANTHOLOGY — a collection of poetry and prose from authors around the works — and applaud Shakespeare for writing the quintessential summer poem, which we will of course include in the SUMMER ANTHOLOGY.

To celebrate the bard’s birthday, we bring you this celebrated poem from his immortal pen.

SONNET 18
by William Shakespeare

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? 

Thou art more lovely and more temperate:

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: 

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm’d; 

And every fair from fair sometime declines,

By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade

Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;

Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,

When in eternal lines to time thou growest: 

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,

So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

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It’s still April — and it’s still National Poetry Month in the United States. The American Academy of Poets has developed a list of 30 ways to celebrate. One of the suggestions is to memorize a poem. We think Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare is a perfect candidate — because it’s “short…with a strong rhythmic underpinning” as the National Poetry Month site suggests.

Illustration: Shakespeare postcard from zazzle.com (on sale for just $1.03).