Archives for posts with tag: tree poems

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THE OAK
by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Live thy Life,
Young and old,
Like yon oak,
Bright in spring,
Living gold;

Summer-rich
Then; and then
Autumn-changed
Soberer-hued
Gold again.

All his leaves
Fall’n at length,
Look, he stands,
Trunk and bough
Naked strength. 

Photo: “Old Oak Tree” by Sue Bristo, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria’s reign and remains one of the most popular British poets. His most famous composition is “The Charge of the Light Brigade” (1854), written about a battle during the Crimean War. The poem includes the often-quoted line: “Theirs not to reason why / Theirs but to do and die.” (For more about Tennyson, visit Wikipedia.)

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THE CHERRY TREE
by David Wagoner

Out of the nursery and into the garden   
where it rooted and survived its first hard winter,   
then a few years of freedom while it blossomed,   
put out its first tentative branches, withstood   
the insects and the poisons for insects,   
developed strange ideas about its height   
and suffered the pruning of its quirks and clutters,   
its self-indulgent thrusts   
and the infighting of stems at cross purposes   
year after year.  Each April it forgot   
why it couldn’t do what it had to do,   
and always after blossoms, fruit, and leaf-fall,   
was shown once more what simply couldn’t happen.   

Its oldest branches now, the survivors carved   
by knife blades, rain, and wind, are sending shoots   
straight up, blood red, into the light again.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: David Wagoner (born June 5, 1926) is an American poet who has written many poetry collections and ten novels. David Wagoner’s Collected Poems was nominated for the National Book Award in 1977 and he won the Pushcart Prize that same year. He was again nominated for a National Book Award in 1979 for In Broken Country. He won his second Pushcart Prize in 1983. He is the recipient of the American Academy of Arts and Letters award, the Sherwood Anderson Foundation Fiction Award, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize (1991), the English-Speaking Union prize from Poetry magazine, and the Arthur Rense Prize in 2011. He has also received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

PAINTING: “Sunny Day Cherries,” watercolor by Diane Morgan, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
 

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THE OAK

by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Live thy Life,
Young and old,
Like yon oak,
Bright in spring,
Living gold;

Summer-rich
Then; and then
Autumn-changed
Soberer-hued
Gold again.

All his leaves
Fall’n at length,
Look, he stands,
Trunk and bough
Naked strength. 

Photo: “Old Oak Tree” by Sue Bristo, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892) was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria’s reign and remains one of the most popular British poets. His most famous composition is “The Charge of the Light Brigade” (1854), written about a battle during the Crimean War. The poem includes the often-quoted line: “Theirs not to reason why / Theirs but to do and die.” (For more about Tennyson, visit Wikipedia.)

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SPRING HAIKU

by Matsuo Bashō (1644-1694)

The oak tree stands
noble on the hill even in
cherry blossom time.

Photo: “Young Oak Tree on Lydeard Hill (UK) at Sunset” by Rich Heath, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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MAGNOLIA RULES

by Erle Kelly

Arms of a Botero woman,
her thick limbs stretch out,
giving shade, coolness;
nemesis to flower or plant
that cannot outlast
the shadow she casts.
 
Fern, calla lily, impatiens,
staghorn, clivia, primrose thrive.
Periwinkle, cosmos, marigold,
poppy struggle for light.
 
Her  scented petals
tower above her domain,
difficult to see, out of reach.
She sheds spiny brown cones
as her only gift.
 
When laced,
this eighty-year old
madam of the yard
rests the eye,
cuts intricate patterns
with clouds against
red twilight sky.

“Magnolia Rules” and other poetry by Erle Kelly will appear in the Silver Birch Press Green Anthology, a collection of poetry and prose from writers living in the U.S., U.K., Europe, and Africa — available March 15, 2013.

Photo: “Giant Magnolia” by Kerri Ivy, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED