1920px-Claude_Monet_-_The_Magpie_-_Google_Art_Project
How the Poet Learns from Snowbound
by Tricia Knoll

Every sentence has potential to sparkle. If not, let it lie silent on other flakes
  and look for a footstep or a pawprint to suggest a new path.

An icicle glints in the sunbeam, a prism. And in moonlight, its glassy
  twist lights the theater of tragedy or midnight romance.

A bit of thaw, one day at a time, and the ice dam drips. Short minutes
  at noon, words may drip if they cannot gush.

The bird feeder witnesses to winter’s hunger. The insatiable
  desire for nurturing, nutrition. Needed feeding

to keep wings beating. Thesaurus on the table. Anthologies
  on the night stand. Pecks of haiku. Suet of sonnets.

Fear lumpy sidewalk ice? Strap on traction cleats and imagine skating.
  Welcome glides. Wind in your hair. Escape. Free verse.

PAINTING: La Pie (The Magpie) by Claude Monet (1868-1869).

NOTE FROM THE AUTHOR: I’m reading poetry craft books, listening to meditation guides, trying to be in the moment. This moment is snow. And more snow. Plows and ice. Pawprints from the squirrels and cottontails. The wing impressions of a hawk capturing a mouse in snow. With the thought there must be something there to learn. As for Vermont, in the next couple of weeks the sap will start running and we will have maple syrup.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tricia Knoll is a Vermont poet who has spent many, many months like everyone else mostly at home. For her, within a small woodlot. Recent months have also brought many feet of snow, the glint of hanging ice, the threat of ice under foot. Fortunately, she’s been doing a lot of writing and looking forward to her new chapbook, Checkered Mates, to come out from Kelsay Books in the next few weeks. Her other collections include Urban Wild, Broadfork Farm, Ocean’s Laugher, and How I Learned To Be White. Visit her at triciaknoll.com. Find her on Amazon and Twitter.